Pork Souvlaki with Cucumber Salad

Chef Kevin Gillespie transported us to Greece with his Pork Souvlaki demonstration. Make this dish for your friends and family with this recipe.

PORK SOUVLAKI 
WITH CUCUMBER SALAD
By Chef Kevin Gillespie

In 2011, Valerie and I honeymooned in Greece. The best meal we had was also the least expensive. We found this little hole-in-the-wall that had a wood-burning grill, a hand-cranked rotisserie, two hot-plate heating elements, and only four tables. It was run by one guy who began our pork souvlaki by walking next door to the butcher shop to
procure a pork loin. He threaded the pork on skewers and grilled it over wood. That pork souvlaki was hands-down the best thing we ate in Greece. This recipe pays homage to that preparation by combining a traditional Greek pork souvlaki with the American penchant for gyros, which is grilled meat wrapped in puffy pita bread. It makes
a satisfying sandwich. If you can find goat’s milk yogurt, that will give the cucumber salad a little more tang and creaminess. But plain old cow’s milk Greek yogurt works fine too.

1 tablespoon dried oregano
3 teaspoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 teaspoons freshly squeezed
lemon juice
3 cloves garlic, crushed
12 ounces boneless, tail end
pork loin, cut into 1-inch cubes
1 Kirby/pickling cucumber,
peeled and diced, about ¾ cup
¼ cup grape tomatoes,
quartered
1 small red bell pepper, ribs and
seeds removed, finely diced,
about ¼ cup
1 jalapeño pepper, ribs and
seeds removed, finely diced
4 pieces Greek-style flatbread or
pocketless pita
1 tablespoon minced red onion
¼ cup Greek yogurt

Mix the oregano, 1 teaspoon of the salt, the olive oil, 1 teaspoon of the
lemon juice, and the garlic in a zip-top bag and smush the bag together
with your hands to combine. Add the pork and toss in the marinade, making
sure all the pieces are covered. Squeeze out the air, zip the top shut, and
marinate at room temperature for at least 2 hours.

Mix the cucumbers, tomatoes, bell pepper, jalapeño, and onion together with
1 teaspoon of the salt. Set aside while the meat marinates.
Heat a grill pan over high heat or an outdoor grill to medium-high. Skewer
the pork onto 4 skewers and put on the grill. Grill until charred on one
side, about 2 minutes, then flip, grilling until all sides are charred; the other
sides will take a little longer, about 3 minutes per side. The meat should
be somewhat firm and have an internal temperature of about 145°F when
done. If you have room on the grill, grill the flatbread to soften it as you cook
the pork; otherwise, when the pork is done, set aside to rest, tented with
aluminum foil, and grill the flatbread just until you have nice charred grill
marks on both sides.

Just before serving, stir the yogurt, the remaining 1 teaspoon lemon juice,
and the remaining 1 teaspoon salt into the cucumber mixture and toss to
combine.

Slide the meat from the skewers onto the flatbread and dress with the
salad. Serve immediately.

GOOD TO KNOW
If you’re using an indoor grill pan, crank it on high heat for the best sear marks. On an outdoor grill, medium-high heat works best.

Get more of Chef Gillespie’s recipes by visiting http://www.chefkevingillespie.com/

Chilled Avocado Soup with Crab, Creme Fraiche and Pickled Jalapeño

Loved Chef Gerry Klaskala’s presentation in the Demonstration Kitchen at The Atlanta International Gift & Home Furnishings Market? Make his Chilled Avocado Soup with Crab, Creme Fraiche and Pickled Jalapeño at home with this recipe.

Chilled Avocado Soup with Crab, Creme Fraiche and Pickled Jalapeño
by Chef Gerry Klaskala

AVOCADO SOUP

  • 4 avocados
  • 1/2 bunch cilantro
  • 1 jalapeño, seeded and minced
  • 1/4 cup lime juice
  • 1 qt. coconut water
  • Salt to taste

Combine the above in a Vita-Prep Blender, puree until smooth. Place in a non-reactive container and keep chilled.

CITRUS MARINATED CRAB

  • 1/4 lb. lump crab
  • Zest of half each, lime, lemon and orange
  • 1 tbsp grapeseed oil
  • 1-1/2 tsp lemon juice
  • Season to taste with salt

Combine the above in a non-reactive bowl, gently mix. Keep chilled.

PICKLED JALAPEÑOS

  • 2 jalapeños
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup water

In an All-Clad sauce pan cook over medium heat for five minutes, remove to a non-active container and chill.

1/4 cup creme fraiche

Serve avocado soup in pre-chilled bowls. Top with creme fraiche, citrus marinated crab and pickled jalapeños.

——-

Prefer to have Chef Klaskala make this for you? Visit Aria at 490 E Paces Ferry Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30305. For more information visit http://www.aria-atl.com/ or call (404) 233-7673.

Learn from more Atlanta chefs at presentations throghout the Market in the Demonstration Kitchen on Building 2, Floor 8.

Catching Up with Stan Topol

St Regis - Stan Topol 2 - Living Room

Award-winning Atlanta-based designer Stan Topol is a fixture at AmericasMart Altlanta, whether he’s scouring Market for new finds or creating a Market Vignette.

Topol once again put his timeless style on display for us in the vignette installation in the Building 1 Lobby, so we asked him to reflect on the foundations of his creative impulse and how he builds a space from scratch.

AmericasMart: Your mantra is “Timeless Design.” How do you begin to create “Timeless Design” in an empty room? Is it one particular item that begins to set things in motion?

Stan Topol: When I see an empty room, I really don’t think about “timeless” or any other design feature. I look at my client and see how they will use this room that we create. It’s more about them, and how I can lead them into a comfortable situation that they are proud of today and will be for the next decade or longer.

AM: There are so many different ways to approach color, as many people seek out unique accents or bold feature walls. Are there certain timeless colors that you feel work in nearly every setting?

577_estroff  /  stan topol _paper cityST: My approach to color is quite simple. I look at my client, check their wardrobe and build our color palette from that. In fact, one day I will tell you a story about Joseph Braswell (the former head of Parsons Interior Design) and his gracious explanation of a Dining Room he did for a lady once who lived on Park Avenue.

AM: Is there a classic structure to building around the key furniture piece in a room? How nontraditional should one go? Can you abandon the settee or bedroom chair for something else? Or even swap the coffee table in a larger living room for, say, several end tables?

ST: A great furniture plan or layout should be able to be translated into either a traditional furnishing plan, a contemporary one or a transitional one. When I taught school, I insisted that a plan has to allow a lady to walk through her room without bumping a chair or a table. How you treat a room is really up to a decorator and their client… That’s why we personally hand draw each person’s room. A plan doesn’t determine the style or the trends that may be current. Remember: Current trends are just that.

AM: When it comes to acquiring art for a client’s space, does their taste dictate the selection, or do you let your vision of the room guide you?

ST: ART. Now we are into my world. I am quite serious about this subject. Our background is art history, and I am proud of that. Knowing the various periods of fine art from the earliest days to the 20th century is vital as one directs or suggests a direction to their client. In fact, one of my favorite moments was with a client in New York City looking for fine art. He saw me wandering away from the presentation and found me almost shaking from delight when I saw a certain painting. He told the dealer he would take that piece before I even rejoined the group. A Franz Kline painting can still do this to me…as can a few others.

Topol_Lutgert_artist_Jules_Olitski

Painting by Jules Olitski

AM: When you’ve completed a room, what about it usually expresses timelessness to you?

ST: Regarding the term “timeless”: Marvelous interiors can and do last a lifetime. The trendy moments we see come and go, but quality, comfort, and simple styles never go out of style because having style means you don’t have to be “stylish.”

AM: Of course, we always like to have our experts impart a bit of their wisdom to the new shoppers at AmericasMart. What key thought should they contemplate as they begin their experience here at the Market?

ST: AmericasMart offers to me and every other decorator or designer a world of choices. You could fly to NYC and go through three or four buildings to find everything that they have in Atlanta in one location.  Come on… Is that really a choice, or do you just want to have dinner at Cipriani’s?

Take a moment during as you enter or exit Market this week to appreciate Stan Topol’s timeless design on display in the Building 1 Lobby. And if you run into him during Market before we do, make sure you ask about that Joseph Braswell story. And while you’re at it, extend an invitation to Cipriani for a drink and discussion of the latest Whitney exhibit during a future visit to New York. Just for kicks.

As a teenager, the Mississippi-born Topol took flight to New York where he became assistant to legendary interior decorator Billy Baldwin. After returning to Atlanta to open his eponymous firm, Topol went on to Chair the Interior Design program at the Art Institute of Atlanta as well. His client list stacks as high as the number of design magazines that have featured his work and includes the Lutgert Companies in Naples, FL, the St. Regis Hotel, and a longstanding relationship with Atlanta’s most famous European export, Sir Elton John.

Stan Topol and Associates is based in Atlanta, GA. For more information visit www.StanTopol.com or call (404) 885-9889. 

Naturally Beautiful

How a love of antiques transforms lifestyle design
By Brooke & Steve Giannetti

Portrait of mid 40's caucasian male-female couple in stone archway looking into dining area of home.

Antiques tell a story, and we believe every home should have its own narrative that embraces history and collections from the past.

We’re known for our “Patina Style” which is our design philosophy based on our belief in the beauty of worn natural finishes. Patina style was born from the combination of Steve’s passion for industrial and architectural antiques and my love of Belgian linens and delicate antiques. In our own homes and the ones we designed for our clients, we found these pieces allowed us to live in beautiful spaces without worrying about each nick or imperfection.

Why do we love designing with antiques? Every antique brings its own personal story to a room. Each worn edge, every mellowed piece of brass is the result of daily experiences the antique has with the people who live with it. When I walk into a room that’s decorated with antiques, I feel their personalities fill the space. Unlike new furniture, each antique is unique. No two pieces have the exact same wear or signs of age. Using antiques ensures that each space is unlike any other, and the combination allows the singular personality of the homeowner to shine through.

Ageless Treasures

When we go on buying trips, we look for pieces with specific characteristics rather than provenance. During our search for antiques, we look for those natural materials that age wonderfully over time… a chesterfield sofa that is still upholstered in the original aged leather, an unfinished wood farm table whose top is dented from the many family meals, copper pots so tarnished that you can almost smell the minestrone soup simmering in it many years ago.

We work with clients of all ages, and we find millennials have been brought up in a time of mass production, yet they are becoming more aware of craftsmanship and the value of pieces with authenticity. Even some of the modern houses Steve designs that are full of contemporary art are always enhanced by antiques.

Artistic Serenity 

Overall, we strive to create serene spaces. This desire is behind our love of antique Swedish pieces. Their pale painted finishes in neutral grays and blues provide a calm color palette to our life. Swedish antiques also have a combination of rustic and refined detailing that allows us to design spaces that are both elegant and comfortable.

We also find ourselves drawn to furniture pieces that embrace the artists and craftspeople who made or used them… the sketch made before the drawing, the wood hat molds from a millinery, or the draper’s table from a cloth merchant. These utilitarian objects add another layer to the story of a room.

Accessible Design 

As a designing couple (Steve as architect, Brooke as designer), we transformed our Los Angeles office into a retail space, which gave us the opportunity to create a store that mixed the antiques we love with our custom furniture. We began to design our own upholstered pieces specifically to complement well-designed antiques. We’re always drawn to furniture pieces that have classical proportions; we use the same classical proportions and human scale.

We cover our pieces using only natural materials that only get better with use. Our linen slipcovers get softer and more comfortable. Our leathers get more comfortable and more complex as time goes by, and our velvets are more beautiful with every crush. It’s part of the beauty of treasured, worn objects.

Steve Giannetti is a renowned architect who specializes in the unique combination of classical and modern architecture. Since founding the firm in 1994, he has designed homes around the world for clients in nearly every architectural style. Steve is now working on homes in California, France, Connecticut and Nashville. Brooke Giannetti runs the company’s interior design studio and is the author of the design blog, Velvet and Linen. She and Steve are the Authors of the books Patina Style (2011), and Patina Farm (2016). The firm’s work has been published in Veranda, The New York Times, Santa Barbara Magazine, C Magazine, and Good Housekeeping, as well as several other publications. Together they own the store Giannetti Home, located in Los Angeles, Calif., which also functions as their studio. They live on Patina Farm with their three children, mini goats, dogs, Sicilian donkeys, chickens, and Hector, the house bunny.

Find ANTIQUES at The Atlanta International Gift & Home Furnishings Market July 13-16, 2017.

Recipes for a Fantastic Fourth of July

Looking for some inspiration for your Independence Day menu? We asked some of the chefs who’ll be in the Demonstration Kitchen this July to help us prepare the perfect summer meal:

Sloppy Joe Burgers with Grilled Onions
Created by Chadwick Boyd

Heirloom Tomato Coleslaw
Created by Hudson Rouse

Savannah Lump Crab Fritters with Thai Dipping Sauce 
Created By Gerry Klaskala

Bandoffee Trifle With Candied Bacon
Peach Party Liquor

Created by Kevin Gillespie


Sloppy Joe Burgers with Grilled Onions                                                                   Copyright © 2017 Lovely & Delicious Enterprises, Inc.                                             Created by Chadwick Boyd

Sloppy Joes are about as American as you can get. And they were a big part of my childhood. As kids, we would eat them at least one night a week. Classic ingredients of ketchup, yellow mustard, a bit of brown sugar and a tich of apple cider vinegar come together for that signature BBQ sweet and tang that makes these sandwiches irresistible. This recipe, featured in my show “Reel Food,” uses all the classic Sloppy Joe flavors, yet reimagines them as burgers. They are great for summertime grilling, but can easily be done inside on a grill pan or a large 12″ cast iron skillet any time of year. The sauce is lip-licking good, so I suggest making a double batch.

 

Makes 4-6 burgers, depending on how hungry you are

Ingredients

For the burgers

  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large sweet onion – one half diced, the other half thinly sliced
  • ½ medium green pepper, roughly chopped
  • 1½ lbs. lean ground beef
  • ½ jalapeno, seeded and finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon chile powder
  • ¼ teaspoon chipotle powder
  • 1 teaspoon celery salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 4-6 brioche buns (find them at a local bakery or use hamburger buns as a substitute)
  • For the sauce
  • 1½ cups ketchup
  • ¼ cup tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons yellow mustard
  • ¼ cup light brown sugar, packed
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 5 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons freshly cracked black pepper

Directions

Preheat grill to medium high heat – 425°F-450°F.

Meanwhile, heat a large 12″ cast iron skillet on the stove to medium-high heat for 2-3 minutes to get it good and hot. Add the olive oil and heat through for 1 minute. Place the diced onion and green peppers in the skillet. Sauté until soft and translucent 5-7 minutes. Stir occasionally with a wooden spoon.

Place the beef in a large mixing bowl. Add in the jalapeno, chile and chipotle powders, celery salt and pepper. Mix well with clean hands or heavy handle wooden spoon. Add in the cooked onions and peppers. Mix until fully incorporated. Form into 4-6 patties, depending on how large you want them to be. Place on a large plate.

Add the rest of the onions to the skillet and let soften and char, about 8-10 minutes. Set aside on a plate.

While the onions are cooking, place a medium-sized skillet on medium heat. Add in all the ingredients for the sauce. Using a whisk, vigorously stir and bring the sauce to a low bubble – 3-4 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low and let simmer while grilling the burgers. Stir occasionally.

Place the burgers on the grill and cook 4-5 minutes until the burgers are browned on the bottom and have grill marks. Place the brioche buns open face along the side of the burgers to warm and crisp up, usually 2-3 minutes – set aside on a clean plate. Using tongs or a large spatula, flip them over and continue cooking another 5-6 minutes until medium or slightly pink in the center. Remove the burgers from the grill and place immediately into the brioche.

Thickly slather the burgers with the sauce and top with the grilled onions.

Serve. Use the extra sauce for dipping.

**If cooking indoors in cast iron: Place the patties in the large skillet and cook 7-8 minutes until the bottom is fully sealed and dark brown. Flip and then cook 7-8 more minutes, or until slightly pink in the center.


Savannah Lump Crab Fritters with Thai Dipping Sauce                                                Created By Gerry Klaskala

Ingredients 

  • 6 oz. – All Purpose Flour
  • 1 Tbl. – Baking Powder
  • ¼ tsp. – Salt
  • ¼ tsp. – Cayenne
  • 8 oz. – Jumbo Lump Crab
  • 4 oz. – Sauteed Scallions
  • 6 oz. – Water

Directions

1. Combine dry ingredients
2. Add crab, scallions and water. Mix just enough to incorporate ingredients.
3. Carefully scoop or spoon mix into ½ oz balls and fry in 350 degree oil until cooked through.

Thai Dipping Sauce

Ingredients

¼ cup – Mae Ploy
1 ea. – Thai Peppers, minced
¼ tsp. – Ginger, minced
2 Tbl. – Lime Juice
1 tsp. – Cilantro

Directions

1. Combine ingredients and stir well


Heirloom Tomato Coleslaw

Created by Chef Hudson Rouse

Ingredients

  • 1 table spoon celery seed
  • 1/8 cup pickle brine
  • 1/8 cup lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup chopped pickles
  • 1 1/2 cup Dukes Mayonnaisel
  • 3 heads of cabbage thinly sliced
  • 4 carrots grated
  • 1 vidalia onionthinly sliced
  • 4  heirloom tomatoes sliced

Instructions

Whisk first 4 ingredients in large bowl to blend. Add cabbage, carrots, onions; toss to coat with dressing. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours and up to 4 hours. Toss in sliced heirloom tomatoes before serving.


Peach Party Liquor                                                                                                       Created by Kevin Gillespie

The name is inspired by the show Squidbillies on Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim. I recently became a Squidbillies cast member, playing myself. The show is hilarious. It’s not for everyone, but I love how it explores the idea of these ultra-redneck characters that are, absurdly, squids. One of the characters, Early Cuyler, makes something he calls “party liquor.” One weekend when the cooks at Woodfire Grill were getting together on Sunday for some fun, I said, jokingly, that I would bring some “party liquor.” And it would include moonshine. “You can’t bring moonshine,” they said. “We’ll all go blind!” I wanted to show them it wasn’t so bad, so I mixed the moonshine with really strong tea and juiced peaches. It tasted like Snapple peach tea and you could barely detect the moonshine. It was so good that we drank all of it. We got to goofing around and thought it would be fun to have a dart tournament. Someone had brought a blow dart gun. Before long, one of us had a brilliant idea and asked, “What if we shot someone with one of these?” That soon digressed into a series of retaliatory dart wounds. That’s when I knew it was time for me to go. Just as my wife, Valerie, and I were walking out the door, I felt this pain in the back of my leg. I craned around, and there was a blow dart sticking out of my calf.

Ingredients

  • Water – 2 cups
  • Black tea bags – 4
  • Agave nectar – ½ cup
  • Peaches – 8 ripe baseball-size ones, pitted and peeled
  • Moonshine – 2 cups
  • Lemon juice – 1/4 cup

Directions

1. Bring the water to a boil in a medium nonreactive saucepan. Add the tea bags, and steep the tea in the hot water for about 30 minutes; you want to end up with very strong tea. Add the agave nectar to the tea and stir until blended. Cool the tea to room temperature.
2. Using a juicer, food processor, or heavy-duty blender, puree the peaches until they are completely smooth. Pour into the pan of tea along with the moonshine and lemon juice, stirring to blend. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer and discard the solids. Cover, chill, and serve ice-cold.

Moonshine / White lightning or moonshine refers to any illegally distilled, unaged white whiskey made in an unregulated still at home. But you can find perfectly legal white whiskey called moonshine in just about every liquor store across the country. Any corn-based liquor will do just fine in this recipe. If you can’t find white whiskey, 80-proof Cathead Vodka from Mississippi is finished with corn and makes a great substitute.

Bandoffee Trifle With Candied Bacon                                                                       Created by Kevin Gillespie

My restaurant Gunshow has no investors. To raise money I did a series of fundraising dinners all over the country. I customized the menu for each group—except for dessert. I’m not much of a pastry chef, so I stuck with my slam-dunk combo of bananas, toffee, and candied bacon. I made it several different ways. At first, I plated it as a deconstructed modernist dessert. Then in Seattle I served a much bigger group of folks and the modernist plating turned out to be too time-consuming. Out of sheer necessity, I made it into a trifle, and that’s what made the dish even more successful. It’s a layered dessert of vanilla custard, Candied Bacon (page 139), crushed shortbread cookies, fried bananas, toffee caramel, and chocolate ganache. You can totally make this at home. The layering makes it look awesome in a glass dish. Serve it with coffee and your friends will think you’re badass.

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1 cup heavy cream, divided
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt or table salt
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Canola oil for frying
  • 3 bananas 5 ounces 65% chocolate,
    chopped
  • 12 ounces shortbread cookies
  • 2 cups vanilla custard or pudding
    (see Good to Know)
  • 16 strips Candied Bacon (page
    139), chopped, 2 pieces
    reserved for garnish

Directions

To make the caramel, melt the butter in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the brown sugar and stir to combine. Bring to a boil and stir in ¾ cup of the cream. Return to a boil and decrease the heat to a low simmer. Simmer, swirling occasionally, until the mixture reaches 235°F, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the salt and vanilla.

Heat the oil in a deep fryer to 350°F.

Peel the bananas and fry until deep golden brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel–lined plate to cool.

Heat the remaining ¼ cup cream in a small saucepan just to a boil, then remove from the heat and stir in the chocolate until melted.

Place the cookies in a large zip-top bag, squeeze out any excess air, and roll with a rolling pin a few times to make very coarse crumbs; you should have about 3 cups.

You can make one large trifle bowl or individual servings in 8-ounce canning jars. To assemble, layer one-third of the cookie crumbs, half the custard, half the bacon, half the fried bananas, half the caramel, and the chocolate; continue layering on the remaining custard, bacon, bananas, and one-third of the crumbs; top with the remaining caramel and crumbs. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate for up to 1 day. Cut the reserved bacon into long strips and garnish each serving with a strip.

See these chefs and more in the Demonstration Kitchen at the July 2017 Atlanta International Gift & Home Furnishings Market, July 11-18, 2017.

 

Inside the HeART of Design

Ever wonder how you can incorporate art into your interiors?

We recently spoke with Robert Leleux, creator of the Southern Style Now Festival and moderator for AmericasMart’s upcoming July Market panel, The HeART of Design: The Indispensable Role of Art in Interiors, for the inside scoop on all things art and design.

 Q: What’s happening in the world of art and design right now?

 A: It’s often the best place to begin designing an interior. Many designers I know begin with art and family heirlooms and things that are absolutely distinct and personal and irreplaceable to an individual, to their home, and then you go forward from there.

Q: How does one incorporate art into a room design?

 A: Once you have the art, then you can incorporate the design tricks. You can use it as a launching pad for all of the setting decisions you make in a room. You can pick upholstery based on the colors of the painting. For example, if it’s a botanical painting, you can try to mirror the botanicals in the fabrics that you choose.

Q: Why is this panel important?

A: Designers have a passion for art and are always engaged in the topic of who the next great artists are and what they can learn from trends and art to apply in the interiors that they create. I think it’s a very relevant topic and one that should be popular.

The panel is great. Amanda Talley’s work is so distinct to New Orleans that you can’t see a beautiful house without seeing one of her paintings in it. Susan Hable is such a talent: a textile designer, a fine artist, and a furniture designer. And then William McLure is an incredibly prolific painter whose work you’re going to see more and more. I’m amazed to which the work of Southern artists drives the national art conversations.

Q: What’s a tip for someone just beginning?

A: Educating yourself about art helps to make a beautiful home. Don’t just look at great magazines like House Beautiful or Architectural Digest, go to museums and that will educate the eye. Not just in terms of the art that you’re attracted to, but it will develop your aesthetic sensibility in decorating your home.

Q: How do you know if the investment is worth it?

 A: Buy art that you love and it will always be worth it to you. Having a lot of friends that grew up in the New York of Warhol and Basquiat, the works of those artists were really affordable at the time, so you just never know. And the fact that you never know should liberate you. You should feel free to explore and buy things that you think are edgy and that appeal to you, because who knows if you’ll win the lottery and your investment will multiple in value. I think that’s the attitude to go into it with.

Make sure to save the date for The HeART of Design: The Indispensable Role of Art in Interiors featuring Robert Leleux, William McLure, Susan Hable and Amanda Talley on Thursday, July 13, in Building 3, Floor 2, Main Stage.

For a list of all upcoming July Market seminars, visit AmericasMart.com/Events.

The Single File (Part 1)

Creating Cool Spaces for Bachelors and Bachelorettes (Part 1)
By Brian Patrick Flynn

From color palettes to labor costs, Brian Patrick Flynn shares tips and tricks for helping single first-time homebuyers turn their condos and houses into homes.

I have absolutely no idea how it happened, but at some point in my career I became the designer who specializes in designing for singles… and I kinda like it. There’s a fresh and exciting newness when it comes to working with guys and girls about town who’ve taken the plunge into first time home ownership. And as someone who’s bought four houses in seven years, I know a thing or two about the process.

Sure, hunting for that perfect chesterfield sofa or searching high and low for an art piece that really speaks to one’s taste is fun, but the truth is 70 percent of the design process is un-fun and having to say no a lot. And what I mean by that is (a) you have to use a lot of math, (b) it’s all about editing out things that won’t last, and (c) it’s a constant game of compromise. If you’re dealing with designing your own first place or helping a single client or friend navigate through a sea of endless decor options, maybe some of these projects will help you set sail and successfully make it to shore in record time and with change to spare.

Take More Chances

Photo: Christina Wedge

Hey, if you’re single right now and buying a home that’s all about Y-O-U, now’s your chance to truly push the envelope with your design decisions. This kitchen was created for a hard-working girl about town who wanted a bright, cheerful place to unwind after long days and to host friends on weekends. To make the kitchen feel more like a room, we swapped a backsplash and upper cabinets with classic floral wallpaper and clean, contemporary floating shelves. The result was a stylish spot to hang out that’s packed with personality and practicality. Should she ever grow tired of the wallpaper, it’s an easy change as opposed to changing out tile which is pricey, messy and a headache to deal with.


Home Office

Photo: Sarah Dorio

Nowadays, most urban professionals under age 40 are working from home at least half of the time. With that said, don’t just stick a desk in a room and call it a day, but instead truly make your home office a daily escape that gets you excited about your inbox. Here, I persuaded a bachelor client to buck the idea of a formal breakfast nook he’d never use and instead outfitted it as a polished place to work from home. I upholstered the walls with linen to help with sound absorption, installed statement lighting and mixed vintage casegoods with custom made pieces to turn the space into a showstopper. While these elements all work together now in a work-related space, they also can fit into any other room in the house should his lifestyle change later.

 

Photo: Sarah Dorio

Collected
When you’re not really sure what you’re overall style is, I say look to the things you’ve collected over the years, then find a way to pull them all together with colors and patterns. The guy who owns this master bedroom is a super athletic, well-traveled bachelor who doesn’t necessarily care for a “designed” home. The answer was to make it all about some key objects that speak to him like the vintage knight sculpture, resin taxidermy and African armchairs. By keeping the backdrop light and neutral, the textures and shapes standout and take center stage.

Photo: Robert Peterson/ Rustic White Photography

Retro
If you’re a single gal in the city and kids or large pets don’t factor into your current lifestyle, I say here’s your chance to go with some high glamour retro appeal. Swank 1960s elements are fun, pretty much forever and also flirty. I like to keep things light and bright with tons of ultra-white and sexy textures such as shag rugs mixed with super sleek finishes like high-gloss paint or shiny jolts of chrome. If you stick with white and silver, you’ll have pieces you can mix with just about everything under the sun for years to come.

Photo: Sarah Dorio

Make it Eclectic
Got a bunch of things you love that don’t go together in any way whatsoever? Well, that’s perfect! In fact, that’s how most of us live: we like lots of things and none of them are necessarily like the other. I created this home studio for a bachelor in Los Angeles packed with a brand new modern desk, a collection of old art, handed-down taxidermy and vintage schoolhouse objects. To tie it all together, I used an all-white backdrop, then updated worn-in wood floors with a 1960s inspired basketweave pattern in aqua, navy and ultra-white.

 

Photo: Sarah Dorio

Go all White
It sounds counter intuitive, but all-white wet spaces such as kitchens and bathrooms are remarkably practical for single people. Dark floors and cabinets tend to show every speck of dust and blemish, but high-gloss white wood floors and glossy white cabinets really just make a space feel more open and airy. If you are not dealing with super large dogs, white floors can really stand up to a lot of traffic, especially if you sand them first and stick with oil-based floor paint sealed with a non-yellowing sealant.

 

Brian Patrick Flynn

 

Brian Patrick Flynn is an interior designer, production designer and set decorator based in Atlanta, Ga. Flynn designs residential properties for private clients as well as sets for television networks, ad campaigns and major online retailers. He designs spaces locally as well as in New York and Los Angeles. Check out his residential and production work on his production company’s website flynnsideout.com.